Due to Worries About Airplane Interference, Verizon and AT&T Have Postponed Critical 5G Expansion

According to The Wall Street Journal, Verizon and AT&T are delaying the rollout of their larger 5G networks after the Federal Aviation Administration warned that the new wireless technology could interfere with some aircraft’s safety systems.

On December 5th, the two businesses intended to launch new 5G networks using so-called “C-band” frequencies. The corporations said on Thursday that the rollout will be postponed until at least January 5th.

According to The Wall Street Journal, Verizon and AT&T are delaying the launch of their expanded 5G networks after the FAA warned that the new wireless technology could interfere with some aircraft’s safety systems.

On December 5th, the two businesses intended to launch new 5G networks using “C-band” frequencies. The corporations announced Thursday that the rollout would be postponed until at least January 5th.

For a long time, the aviation industry has been concerned about C-band interference. Industry representatives told the Federal Communications Commission in August that the introduction of C-band 5G would cause “significant interruptions to utilization of the National Airspace System.”

The FAA issued a “special information bulletin” this week about potential interference issues with safety equipment that relies on radio altimeters, bringing those concerns to a head. Despite the fact that no incidents of “harmful interference” have been documented in other countries to date, the agency warned aircraft operators that they “should be prepared for the possibility that interference from 5G transmitters and other technology could cause certain safety equipment to malfunction, requiring them to take mitigating action that could affect flight operations.”

AT&T announced on Thursday that it is working with the FAA and the FCC to better understand the concerns of the aviation industry. In a statement supplied to The Verge, the corporation added, “It is critical that these discussions be guided by the science and data.” “That is the only way for specialists and engineers to determine whether there are any valid co-existence issues.”

According to Reuters, the CTIA, a major wireless trade association, said last week that companies should be able to utilize C-band 5G “without causing significant interference to aircraft equipment.” As proof, the organization cited the numerous successful C-band deployments in other countries. The organization concluded, “Any delay in activating this spectrum jeopardizes America’s competitiveness.”